The Prologue - My likes and dislikes

The Prologue - My likes and dislikes

Thursday, November 10, 2016

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Norman Turrell

RECENT Posts

  1. Beta It! - thoughts on working with Beta readers
    05 May, 2017
    Beta It! - thoughts on working with Beta readers
    This content can also be found at Huffpost http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/590c6f82e4b046ea176ae9fb I always think my work is brilliant, don't you? Think your work is brilliant, I mean, not mine. Well, perhaps we don't, not all the time. I'm well aware I'm too close to my writing to have a rounded opinion about how things are going. I know everything about my story and can't see the holes; where I haven't related it effectively. Telling your story to others is the point, isn't it? That's
  2. Playing with planning - five easy planning tips for the dedicated pantser
    19 Apr, 2017
    Playing with planning - five easy planning tips for the dedicated pantser
    This post is also available at Huffington http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/58f60102e4b048372700db46 A pantser is somebody who doesn’t like planning - flying by the seat of their pants. Personally, I like planning my novels. There you are. I've said it. There's nothing more pleasurable to me than playing with my story concept and structuring it in all sorts of different ways. It helps me craft a more solid work: I avoid time-consuming writing of work which won't eventually fit I make sure
  3. The practical writer - three point preparation for a productive writing session
    21 Mar, 2017
    The practical writer - three point preparation for a productive writing session
    This post is also available at Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/58d10a28e4b0537abd957493 When you get that precious time in your day to do your writing, you want to make the most of it. Preparation will help you with that. Let’s start with some great quotes from some great people on the importance of preparation, so we’re in no doubt of its importance: “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” - Benjamin Franklin “He who is best prepared can best serve his moment
  4. The writer outside - six writerly things to do when you’re out and about
    07 Mar, 2017
    The writer outside - six writerly things to do when you’re out and about
    This post is also available at Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/58bec12be4b0aeb52475ff17 Although most of your work is done in your writer’s nook, you need to get out and about for your sanity and your health. But that doesn’t mean you stop working. The world is full of inspiration for your writing. Whatever your genre, you need to generate real places and believable characters, and that will come so much easier if you have your brain full of experiences and senses. Here’s
  5. Questions, questions – a beta reader/book reviewer checklist
    23 Feb, 2017
    Questions, questions – a beta reader/book reviewer checklist
    This is post is also available at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/58aeae5fe4b0d0d07e7c679e Ever get the feeling you’ve really enjoyed the book you just read, but you’re not sure why? Writers are always looking for beta readers. These are people who will read their work before publication and comment on it. They want your opinion of whether they have a best seller… or not. Beta readers aren’t providing editor type feedback (although an author will take it if you’re offering it free I’m
  6. Are you ready to be a star? - supporting an e-mail list
    08 Feb, 2017
    Are you ready to be a star? - supporting an e-mail list
    This post is also available at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/589b0c2ae4b02bbb1816c1ae I hear authors saying how they've added X thousands of people to their e-mail list, but is that a good thing? It might be, but what if you imagine them as an audience, sitting there, staring as you stand on the stage? Are you prepared? Here's a quick intro you can skip if you already know all about e-mail lists: An e-mail list is a list of personal addresses that people have given to you with
  7. What’s my line?–a discussion of author biography content
    31 Jan, 2017
    What’s my line?–a discussion of author biography content
    This is also available at Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/5873d889e4b0a5e600a78d5a Continuing on from my previous post about three types of author bio, this one's about the content.  Apart from the personal information you include in your long bio, it's all about achievements and qualifications. Firstly, the ones that you state will need to be relevant to your audience for this particular bio. With fiction you need other fiction achievements. With non-fiction you need
  8. Writers need to be readers - tips for the habit
    19 Jan, 2017
    Writers need to be readers - tips for the habit
    This post is also available at Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/588082a1e4b09d73ca33739b “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” - Stephen King “Good artists copy; great artists steal.” - Picasso (allegedly) “Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.” - T. S. Elliot. “I write because I read. I read
  9. Think audience - three author biography formats
    09 Jan, 2017
    Think audience - three author biography formats
    This article is also available at Huffington Post https://contributor.huffingtonpost.com/cms/post/5873d889e4b0a5e600a78d5a Imagine yourself talking to an audience. You’re in a theatre and your adoring fans pour in to hear all about you. You relax and take them back to your childhood. But a magician appears in a puff of stage effect smoke (really unbelievable) and transports you to an interview with a prospective employer. You look at your notes. You certainly don’t want to tell them that